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Tweeting on the YBR.

Looking back to a seven year old blog.

Along The Yellow Brick Road

Dorothy completed her journey along the yellow brick road without the benefit of any manner of technology. The jury is still out on how much better out lives are because we live in such high-tech times.

Indulge me in a “what-if” moment. What if Dorothy did have access to some 21st century wizardry? What if she had had the ability to ‘tweet.’ What would she have tweeted. Perhaps some of the following might have been found on her Twitter account:

You call that a gentle breeze, Aunt Em? Gentle breeze my fanny. It was a twister. And yeah, hanks for locking me out of the storm cellar.

Just dropped in on this woman. Have to be a little more careful if I ever expect to get a driver’s license.

The vertically challenged citizens say they’re Munchkins. Whatever.

Talk about being over-dressed. Glinda, the hat was a bit much, but thanks…

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ybr in fall

There is something about autumn that I like…even a little more than the other seasons. And since today (Friday, September 22, 2017) autumn will begin at 4:02 pm (EST), what better way to extol the virtues of his amazing season.

Autumn doesn’t come in like the Lion on the yellow brick road. Rather it creeps up on us often masquerading as summer until one morning we wake up and all the leaves on the trees have turned from green to a painter’s pallet of reds, oranges and yellows.

I think autumn is a season to reflect on where we’ve been and where we’re going. If summer is the season where we inhale, autumn is the season where we slowly exhale. It’s the season that gives us a chance to catch our breath.

My time on the YBR has told me that people don’t really want to exhale. People would rather hold their breath than to let it out.  I think people are so afraid of letting go.

British novelist, Samuel Butler, once said “Autumn is the mellower season, and what we lose in flowers we more than gain in fruits.”

Despite the political chaos that is spinning out of control like a wicked twister, we would be wise to welcome the mellow and let it wash over us.

There’s nothing better than autumn on the YBR.

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911tinman

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Donald-Trump-the-Scarecrow-Without-a-Brain--127373

Illustration credit: http://www.freakingnews.com/Donald-Trump-the-Scarecrow-Without-a-Brain-Pictures-140003.asp

What do President Donald Trump, Hamlet, and The Wizard of Oz have in common?  A lot. Let me go right to a snippet of Hamlet’s often quoted soliloquy on man:

What a piece of work is a man! how noble in reason!
how infinite in faculty! in form and moving how express and admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension how like a god!
the beauty of the world! the paragon of animals!
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust?

At first glance it appears that Hamlet is giving a glowing review of man. But when the quote is taken apart and the exclamation points are changed to question marks as they are in some versions of the text, the meaning changes completely. And I believe it is closer to Shakespeare’s intended meaning.

Consider the current meaning of the expression “you’re a piece of work.”  It’s not a compliment. It’s an insult.

So, with that said, if we insert this meaning into the Hamlet quote with the change in punctuation, we come away understanding that man is not noble in reason, not infinite in faculty, etc.

To Trump’s supporters the exclamation points remain. To his detractors the question marks are in place.

For a minute take Trump’s campaign rhetoric and his political moves out of the equation and look at Trump the man, the mere mortal.  Contrary to the saying about actions speaking louder than words, President Trump’s action and words speak out loud and clear.  As a businessman he might be the great and powerful wizard, but as a man, he is a humbug.

Put Trump in Oz and he would fire the Wizard and take over control of the Wonderful Land of Oz. Where the original Wizard might have put green glasses on all the people in the Emerald City to convince them they were seeing what he wanted them to see, he knew in his heart he was misleading the people. (Take note of the word “mislead.”  It literally means to lead people astray.)

In Wizard Trump’s case, he actually believes in his “humbugary.” In truth he is the scarecrow in need of a thoughtful brain. He is also the Tin Man, in need of a compassionate heart. And he is the Lion, but not the Lion who knows he lacks courage. He is the Lion who believes he is the King of the Forest. A lion who roars, rages and tweets.

I have lived through the “reign” of a dozen presidents. My view of them as political leaders means less to me than my view of them as men. I judge them using the checklist in Hamlet’s speech.  I want a person in the White House who is noble in reason, a person who is admirable, and a person who is in action like an angel.

There’s no doubt that Obama, Bush and Clinton might have fallen short in many human areas. However, they were elevated by the office of the presidency and more often than not acted accordingly.

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witch

The annual commencement speech at the University of Oz was delivered by the Wicked Witch of the West, her sister unable to attend the ceremony because she was bogged down with housework.

Good afternoon graduates. While it is customary to be warmly embraced by your commencement speaker, it is not in my purview to offer you hollow plaudits and pleasant platitudes. I will not coddle you, I will not play nice-nice with you, and I will most definitely not bull shit you.  You have a legitimate reason to celebrate because you did finish what you started out to do when you graduated from high school. That’s more than the close to 50% of college bound students can say who didn’t pass the finish line. But don’t get a swelled head. Across the fruited plains of America two million undergraduate degrees are being awarded.  Mathematically that means you are not even one in a million.

Economic statisticians love to point out that college graduates have a much higher life-time earning potential than non-graduates. Big deal. So you spent about $200,000 to get where you are today.  It will take you a decade to break even with your non-graduate contemporaries’ earnings. Imagine what you could have done with that $200,000.  Instead of earning 15 credits studying abroad for a semester, you could have actually lived abroad for four years and come away with a lifetime of valuable experiences.  You could have invested your $200,000 and bought a nice car with the interest.

But for the moment let’s forget about earning potential and let’s focus on what happened to you after four years on the Yellow Brick Road. What did you really learn? What did you really learn here in these hallowed halls and rolling hills that you couldn’t have learned somewhere else? How many hours did you spend in class and working on papers and projects that were wasted hours?  If your four years of college were an orange, how much juice would you have actually squeezed out?

If we were to be really honest you would know that it wasn’t the courses you took in college that made all the difference, but it was the course you set to navigate the waters of higher education. If you didn’t set a course, all the credit courses you took were for naught. But don’t think for a moment that your course had to be a rigid one because many a boat has been dashed upon the rocks because the navigator failed to trim the sails or let them fly when necessary.

Graduation is not a final destination. It’s a port. If you got the most out of your education you will see the open seas and be overwhelmed about all the opportunities that await you.

Please don’t think for a moment that your diploma is equipped with a GPS. Your diploma is like a driver’s license. And if you can remember the day you passed your road test you had no problem saying you still had a lot to learn.

Sometime in the next week or so, check your parents’ odometer and see how many miles they’ve journeyed on the Yellow Brick Road and ask them what they’ve learned in all the years they’ve been driving.

It is totally out of character for me to say anything that is not a tad wicked, but I will break character today and say this. You life is what you make of it and if I can offer you a suggestion, your life will be full of meaning if you take full responsibility for your actions, your motives and your decisions. You will never have full control of what happens to you in life, but you can retain control over how you deal with what life throws at you. So don’t spend your life blaming others.

Formal education eventually comes to an end, but learning does last a lifetime…if you choose a lifetime of learning.

Now get out of here before I turn you into a Munchkin.

 

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crayoladandelion

Word went out on March 30, 2017 that Crayola was going to retire Dandelion, one of eight new colors introduced in 1990. Dandelion wasn’t the first color to be retired. Six colors introduced along with 32 other colors in 1903 when Crayola changed the way we colored as children, bit the dust seven short years later in 1910 (RIP: Permanent Geranium Lake, Dark Venetian Red, Light Venetian Red, Celestial Blue, Charcoal Grey and Raw Sienna.

Yellow crayons have never been given their due in Crayola’s long history.  It should come as no surprise that word of Dandelion’s retirement was met with a degree of sadness on the YBR for two reasons, the first being the direct connection with the Cowardly Lion (The word dandelion is a corruption of the French “dent de lion” – the lion’s tooth) and the second has to do with the “yellow brick road.”

For the moment let’s forget about the color and name connection of the soon to be retired crayon and focus on the word “retired.”

While many people are overjoyed when they “retire,” there are some who rue the day when they are the guest of honor at their own retirement gala. Being retired is, in some ways, like being taken off the shelf.   In baseball jargon it means to be put out…not a very positive term.

With a growing number of baby boomers choosing not to “retire” either because they like to work or because they have no choice, the word retirement needs to be…retired.

We have been conditioned to look upon the time we spend toiling in the market place working or tending a career as the penultimate time of our lives.

I disagree.  While it might be our longest stretch, it does not have to be the most important part of our lives, nor should it be the defining time of our lives.

Consider this. In our youth we don’t say we’ve retired from high school or college. We say we’ve graduated.  The word graduate carries with it a forward motion.  It means growth as in taking the next step.

I say that instead of anyone of us “retiring,” I think we should say we are graduating, graduating to another level in life.

Crayola might be retiring “dandelion,” but our true color never has to, nor should it ever… retire.

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rain on the YBR

With the exception of a freak snow storm that blanketed the poppy field, I don’t believe it ever rained in Oz. But, as that old Ella Fitzgerald song goes, “into each life some rain must fall.”

As I write this blog it is cold, cloudy and an annoying rain continues to fall as it has done all day, as it did yesterday and two days before that…and likely the rain will continue to fall tomorrow.

I don’t think it’s accidental that our spirits sag as the weather sogs. Gloomy days challenge us to rise to any occasion.

Worse than literal rainy days are spiritual rainy days when we have doubts about almost everything. The weight of the world seems to settle on our shoulders.  All we want to do is find sanctuary under covers in a nice warm bed.

The world is filled with people who live from one spiritually rainy day to another. Unfortunately when the sun does break through the clouds many of these people continue to be burdened by cloudy skies.

So many of us are unaware of the clouds that hover over people we come into contact on a daily basis.

Despite Dorothy’s grey life in Kansas she did believe in looking for a rainbow.  I believe with some understanding we can be a rainbow in someone’s life. If we can remember how we felt when the “rain began falling on our heads,” we might better understand how sadness grips other people.

rainbow on ybr

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